June 17, 2021

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Bicycling for Transportation

Bicycling for Transportation
Author : Melissa Bopp,Dangaia Sims,Daniel Piatkowski
Publisher : Elsevier
Release Date : 2018-04-16
Category : Transportation
Total pages :246
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Bicycling for Transportation examines the individual and societal factors of active transportation and biking behavior. The book uses an Interdisciplinary approach to provide a comprehensive overview of bicycling for transportation research. It examines the variability in biking participation among different demographic groups and the multiple levels of influence on biking to better inform researchers and practitioners on the effective use of community resources, programming and policymaking. It is an ideal resource for public health professionals trying to encourage physical activity through biking. In addition, it makes the case for new infrastructure that supports these initiatives. Provides evidence-based insights on cost-effective interventions for improving biking participation Includes numerous case studies and best practices that highlight multi-level approaches in a variety of settings Explores individual and social factors related to biking behavior, such as race, gender and self-efficacy

Bicycle Transportation

Bicycle Transportation
Author : John Forester
Publisher : MIT Press
Release Date : 1994
Category : Sports & Recreation
Total pages :346
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This new edition of John Forester's handbook for transportation policy makers and bicycling advocates has been completely rewritten to reflect changes of the last decade. It includes new chapters on European bikeway engineering, city planning, integration with mass transit and long-distance carriers, "traffic calming," and the art of encouraging private-sector support for bicycle commuting.A professional engineer and an avid bicyclist, John Forester combined those interests in founding the discipline of cycling transportation engineering, which regards bicycling as a form of vehicular transportation equal to any other form of transportation. Forester, who believes that riding a bicycle along streets with traffic is safer than pedaling on restricted bike paths and bike lanes, argues the case for cyclists' rights with zeal and with statistics based on experience, traffic studies, and roadway design standards. Over the nearly two decades since Bicycle Transportation was first published, he has brought about many changes in the national standards for highways, bikeways, bicycles, and traffic laws. His Effective Cycling Program continues to grow.

Contributions of Individual, Physical, and Social Environmental Factors to Bicycling

Contributions of Individual, Physical, and Social Environmental Factors to Bicycling
Author : Yan Xing
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2012
Category : Bicycles
Total pages :129
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Bicycling is widely promoted in many countries as a sustainable means of transportation and a form of physical activity as well. However, the level of bicycling in the US is low compared to some European countries with similar economies and levels of auto ownership. Differences in the physical and social environments in these countries may explain this phenomenon. Previous research has established an association between environmental factors and bicycling. However, empirical knowledge about the influences on bicycling, and relative importance to bicycling, of the physical and social environments as well as individual factors is limited. Additionally, the majority of bicycling in the US is for recreation rather than transportation purposes but few studies have examined the question of bicycling purpose. We use data from an online survey conducted in 2006 in Davis, CA, which has a high bicycling level, and 5 comparison small cities in the western US to examine the contributions of physical and social environments to bicycling. Several aspects of bicycling are examined: bicycle ownership and regular bicycling, as well as bicycling for transportation compared to bicycling for recreation, bicycling distance and daily probability of transportation bicycling. The study employs Structural Equations Modeling to assess the complex relationships between bicycling and environment while controlling for socio-demographics, travel constraints, and attitudinal factors. Individual factors, especially attitudes, play a more important role than environmental factors in explaining bicycling. The attitude of liking bicycling is the most important factor in explaining bicycle ownership and regular bicycling. It also leads to a greater likelihood of transportation-oriented bicycling. The attitude of environmental concern combined with preference for non-motorized travel modes strongly impacts bicycling, especially transportation bicycling. Bicycling self-efficacy contributes to bicycle ownership and regular bicycling, as well as transportation bicycling. It also works as an important mediator through which supportive bicycle infrastructure exerts an influence on bicycling. Both the physical and social environments show significant influences on bicycling, after accounting for socio-demographics, travel constraints, attitudes, and residential preference for bicycling. Supportive bicycling infrastructure encourages, though indirectly through bicycling comfort, the following: owning a bicycle, regular bicycling, higher shares of bicycle rides for transportation, and bicycling longer and more frequently for transportation. A greater mix of land uses may lead an individual to bicycle mostly for transportation, but result in relatively fewer bicycling miles for transportation. Hilly topography discourages owning a bicycle, regular bicycling, and bicycling mostly for transportation, but may encourage bicyclists to be more recreationally oriented. A bicycling culture, especially if a transportation bicycling culture, shows stronger influences on transportation-oriented bicycling than the physical environment does, while controlling for individual factors and residential preference for bicycling. Additionally, the analysis shows a residential self-selection effect, in which people who have a higher level of residential preference for bicycling are more likely to own a bicycle and bicycle regularly, especially to bicycle mostly, more miles, and more frequently for transportation.

Everyday Bicycling

Everyday Bicycling
Author : Elly Blue
Publisher : Microcosm Publishing
Release Date : 2015-07-20
Category : Sports & Recreation
Total pages :160
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Everyday Bicycling is your guide to everything you need to know to get started riding a bicycle for transportation. Elly Blue introduces you to the basics, including street smarts, bike shopping, dressing professionally, carrying everything from groceries to furniture, riding with children, and riding in all weather. With its positive, practical approach, this book is perfect for anyone who has ever dreamed of getting around by bike. The new edition also includes information on bicycling with pets, using bike share, and cycling when you have a physical disability.

Perspectives on Seattle Women's Decisions to Bike for Transportation

Perspectives on Seattle Women's Decisions to Bike for Transportation
Author : Anne Broache
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2012
Category : Bicycle commuting
Total pages :140
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A tangle of health, quality-of-life, environmental, and economic concerns has prompted Seattle and other major US cities to pursue strategies that encourage more trips by foot, bike, and transit. Yet increasing bicycling rates remains a distinct challenge, as evidenced by the extremely low share of Americans---especially women---who choose the two-wheeled mode for their everyday journeys. Even in Seattle, which has earned accolades for bike-friendliness, men compose more than 70 percent of bike commuters. An understudied research area lies in determining why these gender differences exist, to what extent they can be overcome, and, in general, how best to attract cycling skeptics. A better understanding of motives for bicycling among both genders and their nuanced subgroups is essential if planners hope to shift more trips away from motorized modes and reap the array of benefits associated with active transportation. This master's thesis contributes to the limited body of research on gender-related bicycling behavior and preferences by examining four major questions: (1) What are the major barriers associated with Seattle women's decisions to bicycle for transportation? (2) What are the key motives that may cause Seattle women to start or increase their cycling? (3) How do these barriers and motives differ among Seattle women who do or do not consider themselves daily riders? and (4) Based on these factors, what strategies might planners and other interested stakeholders employ to encourage more cycling among Seattle women? This research centers on a quantitative analysis of responses from a non-representative sample of 365 Seattle women, including 106 women who reported not riding for any of their everyday trips and 259 women who reported riding daily, collected through a survey by the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals' Women's Cycling Project in 2010. Through a quantitative comparison of these two ridership groups, I investigated how barriers and motives vary by self-reported experience levels. My analysis was informed by the ecological model, which suggests that individual, social-environment, and physical-environment factors all play roles in transportation behavior. Consistent with existing literature, safety in the presence of motorized traffic was the paramount concern for daily and non-daily riders alike. Weather, steep topography, distances between origins and destinations, route connectivity, and grooming and cargo issues also played important roles in the women's cycling decisions, especially for non-daily riders. By contrast, bike and equipment issues, presence of social supports in the community, and connectivity with transit appeared to be less relevant considerations. Based on these findings, I recommended that planners consider greater separation of bikes from motorized traffic, improve end-of-trip facilities, explore creative workarounds to steep topography, seek solutions to increase route connectivity, and enhance marketing activities that address cycling for transportation as a lifestyle.

Wisconsin Bicycle Transportation Plan

Wisconsin Bicycle Transportation Plan
Author : Wisconsin. Division of Transportation Investment Management. Bureau of Planning
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1998
Category : Bicycle trails
Total pages :88
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Synthesis of Successful Bicycle Planning in Mid-size Cities

Synthesis of Successful Bicycle Planning in Mid-size Cities
Author : Hongchao Liu,Wesley Kumfer,Bhargavi Chintaluri,Texas. Department of Transportation,Texas Tech University. Center for Multidiscliplinary Research in Transportation,United States. Federal Highway Administration
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2011
Category : Bicycle commuting
Total pages :120
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Everyday Bicycling

Everyday Bicycling
Author : Elly Blue
Publisher : Microcosm Publishing
Release Date : 2014-11-29
Category : Sports & Recreation
Total pages :128
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Everyday Bicycling is a guide to everything you need to know to get started riding a bicycle for transportation. Elly Blue introduces you to the basics, including street smarts, bike shopping, dressing professionally, carrying everything from groceries to children to furniture, and riding in all weather. With its positive, practical approach, this book is perfect for anyone who has ever dreamed of riding a bicycle for transportation.

Bicycling for Everyone

Bicycling for Everyone
Author : United States. Department of Transportation
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1974
Category : Bicycle trails
Total pages :24
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Ohio Transportation Facts

Ohio Transportation Facts
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1989
Category : Transportation
Total pages :129
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Creating Cultural Change Through the Theory of Planned Behavior and Cultural Interpretation

Creating Cultural Change Through the Theory of Planned Behavior and Cultural Interpretation
Author : Hobit Lafaye
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2011
Category : Choice of transportation
Total pages :243
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Purpose of the project is to promote the safe use of utilitarian bicycling, specifically bicycling as a means of transportation, through the design of a series of interpretive signs along with an associated website for the example city of Ithaca, NY. The author posits that creating a significant modal shift in transportation mode from motor vehicles requires interrelated changes in policy, infrastructure, and cultural beliefs -- and asserts that this project addresses the latter. Using interpretive exhibits and the theory of planned behavior, the following goals are to be promoted: awareness of cycling as feasible transportation option; drivers' awareness and empathy of cyclists; provide drivers and cyclists with an easily accessible source of information; promote the social acceptability and efficacy of cycling; reduce barriers to participation. Also provides an overview of research on the personal and societal benefits of bike commuting, constraints, promotion strategies, and the theory of planned behavior.

Creating Bicycle-friendly Cities

Creating Bicycle-friendly Cities
Author : Cody Bird
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2010
Category :
Total pages :129
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This report examines the use of bicycling as a transportation alternative to the personal automobile in the United States. It begins with a review of historical trends that caused Americans to move away from bicycling for transportation and choosing to adopt automobiles as the primary mode of transportation. A review of articles, reports, and studies is used to consider the benefits connected with utilitarian cycling and electing to bicycle for transportation. The report focuses on three prominent barriers that affect an individual's decision to bicycle: bicycle safety, bicycle consciousness, and bicycle infrastructure. The study discusses how these three obstacles are considerable factors affecting bicycling. The study also discusses a number of exemplary solutions for overcoming these barriers that have been implemented in bicycle-friendly cities in the United States. An analysis of plans and policies for the bicycle-friendly cities of Portland, Oregon and Davis, California is used to determine what historical actions have led to a more complete bicycle network in these two cities which have elected to promote bicycling. An in-depth evaluation of Boulder, Colorado, provides insight for specific plans that have been adopted and strategies that have proven to be successful in improving bicycling for transportation. The report attempts to demonstrate that bicycling can be made a viable means of transportation in United States' communities by adopting comprehensive plans and policies that address the challenges of bicycle safety, bicycle consciousness, and bicycle infrastructure simultaneously.

South Dakota Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, 1992

South Dakota Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, 1992
Author : South Dakota. Division of Parks & Recreation
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1992
Category : Outdoor recreation
Total pages :129
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City Cycling

City Cycling
Author : John Pucher,Ralph Buehler
Publisher : MIT Press
Release Date : 2012-10-19
Category : Sports & Recreation
Total pages :416
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A guide to today's urban cycling renaissance, with information on cycling's health benefits, safety, bikes and bike equipment, bike lanes, bike sharing, and other topics. Bicycling in cities is booming, for many reasons: health and environmental benefits, time and cost savings, more and better bike lanes and paths, innovative bike sharing programs, and the sheer fun of riding. City Cycling offers a guide to this urban cycling renaissance, with the goal of promoting cycling as sustainable urban transportation available to everyone. It reports on cycling trends and policies in cities in North America, Europe, and Australia, and offers information on such topics as cycling safety, cycling infrastructure provisions including bikeways and bike parking, the wide range of bike designs and bike equipment, integration of cycling with public transportation, and promoting cycling for women and children. City Cycling emphasizes that bicycling should not be limited to those who are highly trained, extremely fit, and daring enough to battle traffic on busy roads. The chapters describe ways to make city cycling feasible, convenient, and safe for commutes to work and school, shopping trips, visits, and other daily transportation needs. The book also offers detailed examinations and illustrations of cycling conditions in different urban environments: small cities (including Davis, California, and Delft, the Netherlands), large cities (including Sydney, Chicago, Toronto and Berlin), and “megacities” (London, New York, Paris, and Tokyo). These chapters offer a closer look at how cities both with and without historical cycling cultures have developed cycling programs over time. The book makes clear that successful promotion of city cycling depends on coordinating infrastructure, programs, and government policies.

Bicycling in Pennsylvania: Recommended state policies for providing bicycle facilities and programs

Bicycling in Pennsylvania: Recommended state policies for providing bicycle facilities and programs
Author : Barton-Aschman Associates
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1975
Category : Bicycle trails
Total pages :129
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