November 30, 2020

Download Ebook Free Ecological Understanding

Ecological Understanding

Ecological Understanding
Author : Steward T.A. Pickett,Jurek Kolasa,Clive G. Jones
Publisher : Elsevier
Release Date : 2013-10-22
Category : Science
Total pages :206
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Ecology is an historical science in which theories can be as difficult to test as they are to devise. This volume, intended for ecologists and evolutionary biologists, reviews ecological theories, and how they are generated, evaluated, and categorized. Synthesizing a vast and sometimes labyrinthine literature, this book is a useful entry into the scientific philosophy of ecology and natural history. The need for integration of the contributions to theory made by different disciplines is a central theme of this book. The authors demonstrate that only through such integration will advances in ecological theory be possible. Ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and other serious students of natural history will want this book.

Antarctic Ecosystems

Antarctic Ecosystems
Author : William Davison,C. Howard-Williams,Paul Broady
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2000
Category : Animal populations
Total pages :334
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A Recursive Vision

A Recursive Vision
Author : Peter Harries-Jones
Publisher : University of Toronto Press
Release Date : 1995-01-01
Category : Philosophy
Total pages :358
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Gregory Bateson was one of the most original social scientists of this century. He is widely known as author of key ideas used in family therapy - including the well-known condition called 'double bind' . He was also one of the most influential figures in cultural anthropology. In the decade before his death in 1980 Bateson turned toward a consideration of ecology. Standard ecology concentrates on an ecosystem's biomass and on energy budgets supporting life. Bateson came to the conclusion that understanding ecological organization requires a complete switch in scientific perspective. He reasoned that ecological phenomena must be explained primarily through patterns of information and that only through perceiving these informational patterns will we uncover the elusive unity, or integration, of ecosystems. Bateson believed that relying upon the materialist framework of knowledge dominant in ecological science will deepen errors of interpretation and, in the end, promote eco-crisis. He saw recursive patterns of communication as the basis of order in both natural and human domains. He conducted his investigation first in small-scale social settings; then among octopus, otters, and dolphins. Later he took these investigations to the broader setting of evolutionary analysis and developed a framework of thinking he called 'an ecology of mind.' Finally, his inquiry included an ecology of mind in ecological settings - a recursive epistemology. This is the first study of the whole range of Bateson's ecological thought - a comprehensive presentaionof Bateson's matrix of ideas. Drawing on unpublished letters and papers, Harries-Jones clarifies themes scattered throughout Bateson's own writings, revealing the conceptual consistency inherent in Bateson's position, and elaborating ways in which he pioneered aspects of late twentieth-century thought.

The Ecology of Place

The Ecology of Place
Author : Ian Billick,Mary V. Price
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release Date : 2012-08-01
Category : Science
Total pages :480
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Ecologists can spend a lifetime researching a small patch of the earth, studying the interactions between organisms and the environment, and exploring the roles those interactions play in determining distribution, abundance, and evolutionary change. With so few ecologists and so many systems to study, generalizations are essential. But how do you extrapolate knowledge about a well-studied area and apply it elsewhere? Through a range of original essays written by eminent ecologists and naturalists, The Ecology of Place explores how place-focused research yields exportable general knowledge as well as practical local knowledge, and how society can facilitate ecological understanding by investing in field sites, place-centered databases, interdisciplinary collaborations, and field-oriented education programs that emphasize natural history. This unique patchwork of case-study narratives, philosophical musings, and historical analyses is tied together with commentaries from editors Ian Billick and Mary Price that develop and synthesize common threads. The result is a unique volume rich with all-too-rare insights into how science is actually done, as told by scientists themselves.

A New Approach to Ecological Education

A New Approach to Ecological Education
Author : Gillian Judson
Publisher : Peter Lang
Release Date : 2010
Category : Nature
Total pages :184
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"Part of the Peter Lang Education list"--P. facing t.p.

Understanding Basic Ecological Concepts

Understanding Basic Ecological Concepts
Author : Audrey N. Tomera
Publisher : Walch Publishing
Release Date : 2001
Category : Education
Total pages :204
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This introductory text for high school students delves into the ecological topics that young people relate to: Global warming Deforestation Water supplies How communities and ecosystems interact, and much more. Photographs, drawings and charts, and reviews help students come to grips with complex issues. A variety of labs and activities build interest as they simultaneously develop thinking skills. Understanding Basic Ecological Concepts is ideal for non-science students.

Ecological Complexity and Agroecology

Ecological Complexity and Agroecology
Author : John Vandermeer,Ivette Perfecto
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date : 2017-10-24
Category : Science
Total pages :250
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This text reflects the immense current growth in interest in agroecology and changing approaches to it. While it is acknowledged that the science of ecology should be the basis of agroecological planning, many analysts have out-of-date ideas about contemporary ecology. Ecology has come a long way since the old days of "the balance of nature" and other romantic notions of how ecological systems function. In this context, the new science of complexity has become extremely important in the modern science of ecology. The problem is that it tends to be too mathematical and technical and thus off-putting for the average student of agroecology, especially those new to the subject. Therefore this book seeks to present ideas about ecological complexity with a minimum of formal mathematics. The book’s organization consists of an introductory chapter, and a second chapter providing some of the background to basic ecological topics as they are relevant to agroecosystrems (e.g., soil biology and pest control). The core of the book consists of seven chapters on key intersecting themes of ecological complexity, including issues such as spatial patterns, network theory and tipping points, illustrated by examples from agroecology and agricultural systems from around the world.

Opportunities to Use Remote Sensing in Understanding Permafrost and Related Ecological Characteristics

Opportunities to Use Remote Sensing in Understanding Permafrost and Related Ecological Characteristics
Author : National Research Council,Division on Earth and Life Studies,Polar Research Board,Committee on Opportunities to Use Remote Sensing in Understanding Permafrost and Ecosystems: A Workshop
Publisher : National Academies Press
Release Date : 2014-06-04
Category : Science
Total pages :84
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Permafrost is a thermal condition -- its formation, persistence and disappearance are highly dependent on climate. General circulation models predict that, for a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, mean annual air temperatures may rise up to several degrees over much of the Arctic. In the discontinuous permafrost region, where ground temperatures are within 1-2 degrees of thawing, permafrost will likely ultimately disappear as a result of ground thermal changes associated with global climate warming. Where ground ice contents are high, permafrost degradation will have associated physical impacts. Permafrost thaw stands to have wide-ranging impacts, such as the draining and drying of the tundra, erosion of riverbanks and coastline, and destabilization of infrastructure (roads, airports, buildings, etc.), and including potential implications for ecosystems and the carbon cycle in the high latitudes. Opportunities to Use Remote Sensing in Understanding Permafrost and Related Ecological Characteristics is the summary of a workshop convened by the National Research Council to explore opportunities for using remote sensing to advance our understanding of permafrost status and trends and the impacts of permafrost change, especially on ecosystems and the carbon cycle in the high latitudes. The workshop brought together experts from the remote sensing community with permafrost and ecosystem scientists. The workshop discussions articulated gaps in current understanding and potential opportunities to harness remote sensing techniques to better understand permafrost, permafrost change, and implications for ecosystems in permafrost areas. This report addresses questions such as how remote sensing might be used in innovative ways, how it might enhance our ability to document long-term trends, and whether it is possible to integrate remote sensing products with the ground-based observations and assimilate them into advanced Arctic system models. Additionally, the report considers the expectations of the quality and spatial and temporal resolution possible through such approaches, and the prototype sensors that are available that could be used for detailed ground calibration of permafrost/high latitude carbon cycle studies.

Ecological Identity

Ecological Identity
Author : Mitchell Thomashow
Publisher : MIT Press
Release Date : 1996
Category : Science
Total pages :228
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Through theoretical discussion as well as hands-on participatory learning approaches, Thomashow provides concerned citizens, teachers, and students with the tools needed to become reflective environmentalists. Mitchell Thomashow, a preeminent educator, shows how environmental studies can be taught from different perspective, one that is deeply informed by personal reflection. Through theoretical discussion as well as hands-on participatory learning approaches, Thomashow provides concerned citizens, teachers, and students with the tools needed to become reflective environmentalists. What do I know about the place where I live? Where do things come from? How do I connect to the earth? What is my purpose as a human being? These are the questions that Thomashow identifies as being at the heart of environmental education. Developing a profound sense of oneself in relationship to natural and social ecosystems is necessary grounding for the difficult work of environmental advocacy. In this book he provides a clear and accessible guide to the learning experiences that accompany the construction of an "ecological identity": using the direct experience of nature as a framework for personal decisions, professional choices, political action, and spiritual inquiry. Ecological Identity covers the different types of environmental thought and activism (using John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, and Rachel Carson as environmental archetypes, but branching out into ecofeminism and bioregionalism), issues of personal property and consumption, political identity and citizenship, and integrating ecological identity work into environmental studies programs. Each chapter has accompanying learning activities such as the Sense of Place Map, a Community Network Map, and the Political Genogram, most of which can be carried out on an individual basis. Although people from diverse backgrounds become environmental activists and enroll in environmental studies programs, they are rarely encouraged to examine their own history, motivations, and aspirations. Thomashow's approach is to reveal the depth of personal experience that underlies contemporary environmentalism and to explore, interpret, and nurture the learning spaces made possible when people are moved to contemplate their experience of nature.

Ecological Research and Surveys

Ecological Research and Surveys
Author : United States. Congress. Senate. Interior and Insular Affairs
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1966
Category : Ecological surveys
Total pages :160
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From Traditional to Ecological

From Traditional to Ecological
Author : Stephen Houghton
Publisher : Nova Publishers
Release Date : 2006
Category : Medical
Total pages :215
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The majority of research conducted in the field of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) has comprised laboratory-based psychological studies using highly repetitive and boring tasks. Hence, the generalisability of such work is somewhat limited. This book describes, in three sections, a unique research program which successfully sought to achieve ecological validity in research. Specifically, the three sections describe: (i) the historical conceptualisation of AD/HD and the emergence of models of AD/HD; (ii) the development of a unique quantitative research program incorporating studies using a traditional approach through to those conducted in naturalistic settings; and (iii) the initiation of a related grounded theory' research approach to bringing about a fuller understanding of the everyday experiences of individuals with AD/HD.

Understanding Urban Ecosystems

Understanding Urban Ecosystems
Author : Alan R. Berkowitz,Charles H. Nilon,Karen S. Hollweg
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date : 2006-05-29
Category : Political Science
Total pages :526
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Nowhere on Earth is the challenge for ecological understanding greater, and yet more urgent, than in those parts of the globe where human activity is most intense - cities. People need to understand how cities work as ecological systems so they can take control of the vital links between human actions and environmental quality, and work for an ecologically and economically sustainable future. An ecosystem approach integrates biological, physical and social factors and embraces historical and geographical dimensions, providing our best hope for coping with the complexity of cities. This book is a first of its kind effort to bring together leaders in the biological, physical and social dimensions of urban ecosystem research with leading education researchers, administrators and practitioners, to show how an understanding of urban ecosystems is vital for urban dwellers to grasp the fundamentals of ecological and environmental science, and to understand their own environment.

Ecology and Design

Ecology and Design
Author : Bart Johnson,Bart R. Johnson,Kristina Hill
Publisher : Island Press
Release Date : 2002
Category : Architecture
Total pages :530
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Professionals, faculty, and students are aware of the pressing need to integrate ecological principles into environmental design and planning education, but few materials exist to facilitate that development.Ecology and Design addresses that shortcoming by articulating priorities and approaches for incorporating ecological principles in the teaching of landscape design and planning. The book explains why landscape architecture and design and planning faculty should include ecology as a standard part of their courses and curricula, provides insights on how that can be done, and offers models from successful programs. The book: examines the need for change in the education and practice of landscape architecture and in the physical planning and design professions as a whole asks what designers and physical planners need to know about ecology and what applied ecologists can learn from design and planning develops conceptual frameworks needed to realize an ecologically based approach to design and planning offers recommendations for the integration of ecology within a landscape architecture curriculum, as an example for other design fields such as civil engineering and architecture considers the implications for professional practice explores innovative approaches to collaboration among designers and ecologistsIn addition to the editors, contributors include Carolyn Adams, Jack Ahern, Richard T. T. Forman, Michael Hough, James Karr, Joan Iverson Nassauer, David Orr, Kathy Poole, H. Ronald Pulliam, Anne Whiston Spirn, Sandra Steingraber, Carl Steinitz, Ken Tamminga, and William Wenk. Ecology and Design represents an important guidepost and source of ideas for faculty, students, and professionals in landscape architecture, urban design, planning and architecture, landscape ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, civil and environmental engineering, and related fields.

The Ecological Basis of Conservation

The Ecological Basis of Conservation
Author : Professor of Ecology Moshe Shachak,Professor Gene E Likens
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date : 1997-01-31
Category : Nature
Total pages :466
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The conservation and management of wild natural resources stands at a crossroads. On the one hand, there are the stunning successes of the focus of species, of which the protection of endangered species is the pinnacle. On the other hand, stands the need for conservation to embrace landscapes and ecosystems, and to be more anticipatory and forward looking, rather than responding to manifest endangerment and acute crisis. These needs are the emerging agenda of conservation ecology. To advance the internal agenda of the science, theories, models, and field studies of populations and ecosystems will need to be better integrated. The book attempts to bring these two aspects of ecology closer together in conservation. A new paradigm in ecology paves the way for this integration. The parallel changes in conservation can also enhance the synthesis between ecology and conservation practice. The book explores a broad range of targets for conservation, illustrating the value of the new syntheses. Furthermore, the contributors evaluate the role of theory, and of both familiar and novel types of models, to indicate how such tools can be employed over the range of scales and processes that conservation must now address. The book contains diverse practical examples and case studies of how the new thinking in ecology, and the new partnerships required for more successful conservation, actually work and can be improved. The examples range from freshwater to arid, and from subtropical to boreal. The strongest use of science in conservation requires effective linkage between science and policy, and between science and management. The land ethic motivates the external agenda for science and its application and the resulting activity of scientists in the public discourse. Recommendations for the scope and nature of scientific engagement in the public debate are presented. Interactions with the media and presentation of ecological information to the public are key tools scientists must hone. Analysis of the practical needs and the policy landscape suggest priorities for management and for research. The external agenda to be addressed by science and its application is the complex interaction of human population size, culture, and economics with ecological systems.

Understanding Human Ecology

Understanding Human Ecology
Author : Robert Dyball,Barry Newell
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date : 2014-11-11
Category : Nature
Total pages :214
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We are facing hugely complex challenges – from climate change to world poverty, our problems are part of an inter-related web of social and natural systems. Human ecology promises an approach to these complex challenges, a way to understand these problems holistically and to start to manage them more effectively. This book offers a coherent conceptual framework for Human Ecology – a clear approach for understanding the many systems we are part of and for how we frame and understand the problems we face. Blending natural, social and cognitive sciences with dynamical systems theory, the authors offer systems approaches that are accessible to all, from the undergraduate student to policy-makers and practitioners across government, business and community. Road-tested and refined over a decade of teaching and workshops, the authors have built a clear, inspiring and important framework for anyone approaching the management of complex problems and the transition to sustainability.