January 22, 2021

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Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
Author : Dr Daniel K Richter
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release Date : 2009-06
Category : History
Total pages :336
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In the beginning, North America was Indian country. But only in the beginning. After the opening act of the great national drama, Native Americans yielded to the westward rush of European settlers. Or so the story usually goes. Yet, for three centuries after Columbus, Native people controlled most of eastern North America and profoundly shaped its destiny. In Facing East from Indian Country, Daniel K. Richter keeps Native people center-stage throughout the story of the origins of the United States. Viewed from Indian country, the sixteenth century was an era in which Native people discovered Europeans and struggled to make sense of a new world. Well into the seventeenth century, the most profound challenges to Indian life came less from the arrival of a relative handful of European colonists than from the biological, economic, and environmental forces the newcomers unleashed. Drawing upon their own traditions, Indian communities reinvented themselves and carved out a place in a world dominated by transatlantic European empires. In 1776, however, when some of Britain's colonists rebelled against that imperial world, they overturned the system that had made Euro-American and Native coexistence possible. Eastern North America only ceased to be an Indian country because the revolutionaries denied the continent's first peoples a place in the nation they were creating. In rediscovering early America as Indian country, Richter employs the historian's craft to challenge cherished assumptions about times and places we thought we knew well, revealing Native American experiences at the core of the nation's birth and identity.

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
Author : Daniel K. Richter
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2008-06-05
Category : History
Total pages :317
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Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
Author : Daniel K. Richter
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2003
Category : History
Total pages :317
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Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
Author : Daniel K. Richter
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2003
Category : Indians of North America
Total pages :317
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Before the Revolution

Before the Revolution
Author : Daniel K. Richter
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release Date : 2011-08-25
Category : History
Total pages :560
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In this epic synthesis, Richter reveals a new America. Surveying many centuries prior to the American Revolution, we discover the tumultuous encounters between the peoples of North America, Africa, and Europe and see how the present is the accumulation of the ancient layers of the past.

Indians and English

Indians and English
Author : Karen Ordahl Kupperman
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release Date : 2000
Category : History
Total pages :297
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In this vividly written book, prize-winning author Karen Ordahl Kupperman refocuses our understanding of encounters between English venturers and Algonquians all along the East Coast of North America in the early years of contact and settlement. All parties in these dramas were uncertain--hopeful and fearful--about the opportunity and challenge presented by new realities. Indians and English both believed they could control the developing relationship. Each group was curious about the other, and interpreted through their own standards and traditions. At the same time both came from societies in the process of unsettling change and hoped to derive important lessons by studying a profoundly different culture. These meetings and early relationships are recorded in a wide variety of sources. Native people maintained oral traditions about the encounters, and these were written down by English recorders at the time of contact and since; many are maintained to this day. English venturers, desperate to make readers at home understand how difficult and potentially rewarding their enterprise was, wrote constantly of their own experiences and observations and transmitted native lore. Kupperman analyzes all these sources in order to understand the true nature of these early years, when English venturers were so fearful and dependent on native aid and the shape of the future was uncertain. Building on the research in her highly regarded book Settling with the Indians, Kupperman argues convincingly that we must see both Indians and English as active participants in this unfolding drama. --David Sloan, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. History: Reviews of New Books. Summer, 2000. "Library Journal"

The Ordeal of the Longhouse

The Ordeal of the Longhouse
Author : Daniel K. Richter
Publisher : UNC Press Books
Release Date : 2011-05-01
Category : History
Total pages :454
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Richter examines a wide range of primary documents to survey the responses of the peoples of the Iroquois League--the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas, and Tuscaroras--to the challenges of the European colonialization of North America. He demonstrates that by the early eighteenth century a series of creative adaptations in politics and diplomacy allowed the peoples of the Longhouse to preserve their cultural autonomy in a land now dominated by foreign powers.

New Worlds for All

New Worlds for All
Author : Colin G. Calloway
Publisher : JHU Press
Release Date : 1998-02-18
Category : History
Total pages :229
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Although many Americans consider the establishment of the colonies as the birth of this country, in fact Early America already existed long before the arrival of the Europeans. From coast to coast, Native Americans had created enduring cultures, and the subsequent European invasion remade much of the existing land and culture. In New Worlds for All, Colin Calloway explores the unique and vibrant new cultures that Indians and Europeans forged together in early America. The journey toward this hybrid society kept Europeans' and Indians' lives tightly entwined: living, working, worshiping, traveling, and trading together—as well as fearing, avoiding, despising, and killing one another. In the West, settlers lived in Indian towns, eating Indian food. In Mohawk Valley, New York, Europeans tattooed their faces; Indians drank tea. And, a unique American identity emerged.

Violence over the Land

Violence over the Land
Author : Ned BLACKHAWK
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release Date : 2009-06-30
Category : History
Total pages :384
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"Blackhawk, a Western Shoshone himself, does not portray the natives as victims. Instead, he demonstrates that their perseverance and ability to adapt to changing conditions over the last two centuries allowed them to help shape the world around them ... This is one of the finest studies available on native peoples of the ggreat basin region." John Burch, Library Journal, from the bookjacket.

"Farewell, My Nation"

Author : Philip Weeks
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release Date : 2016-02-16
Category : History
Total pages :368
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The fully updated third edition of "Farewell, My Nation" considers the complex and often tragic relationships between American Indians, white Americans, and the U.S. government during the nineteenth century, as the government tried to find ways to deal with social and political questions about how to treat America's indigenous population. Updated to include new scholarship that has appeared since the publication of the second edition as well as additional primary source material Examines the cultural and material impact of Western expansion on the indigenous peoples of the United States, guiding the reader through the significant changes in Indian-U.S. policy over the course of the nineteenth century Outlines the efficacy and outcomes of the three principal policies toward American Indians undertaken in varying degrees by the U.S. government - Separation, Concentration, and Americanization - and interrogates their repercussions Provides detailed descriptions, chronology and analysis of the Plains Wars supported by supplementary maps and illustrations

How the Indians Lost Their Land

How the Indians Lost Their Land
Author : Stuart BANNER
Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release Date : 2009-06-30
Category : History
Total pages :352
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Between the early seventeenth century and the early twentieth, nearly all the land in the United States was transferred from American Indians to whites. How did Indians actually lose their land? Stuart Banner argues that neither simple coercion nor simple consent reflects the complicated legal history of land transfers. Instead, time, place, and the balance of power between Indians and settlers decided the outcome of land struggles.

Justice in Indian Country

Justice in Indian Country
Author : Sari Horwitz,The Washington Post
Publisher : Diversion Books
Release Date : 2015-04-14
Category : Political Science
Total pages :129
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This eye-opening report is the product of a year-long investigation into how the legal system in Indian country fails some of America's most vulnerable citizens—and what is being done to begin to rectify an ongoing tragedy. Sari Horwitz, recipient of the ASNE Award for Distinguished Writing on Diversity, traveled to an Indian reservation in Minnesota to interview a Native American woman who had been sexually assaulted, as had her mother and daughter. In each case, the assailants, who were not Native American, were not prosecuted due to loopholes in the laws on jurisdiction of criminal prosecution on Indian reservations. This story set her off on a journey across the country, into remote villages and tribal lands where Horwitz uncovered the widespread failures of the American legal system and its inability to protect Native American women and children. This powerful call-to-action gives a view that is charged and insightful, exploring the deeply human consequences of a bureaucracy that has often done more harm than good. As President Obama's administration sets out to close the loopholes and bring justice to survivors, Horwitz speaks to the people these new laws will impact, describes their hopes for the future and gives voice to those who have been silent for too long.

Skull Wars

Skull Wars
Author : David Hurst Thomas
Publisher : Basic Books
Release Date : 2001-04-05
Category : Social Science
Total pages :352
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The 1996 discovery, near Kennewick, Washington, of a 9,000-year-old Caucasoid skeleton brought more to the surface than bones. The explosive controversy and resulting lawsuit also raised a far more fundamental question: Who owns history? Many Indians see archeologists as desecrators of tribal rites and traditions; archeologists see their livelihoods and science threatened by the 1990 Federal reparation law, which gives tribes control over remains in their traditional territories. In this new work, Thomas charts the riveting story of this lawsuit, the archeologists' deteriorating relations with American Indians, and the rise of scientific archeology. His telling of the tale gains extra credence from his own reputation as a leader in building cooperation between the two sides.

Native Activism in Cold War America

Native Activism in Cold War America
Author : Daniel M. Cobb
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2008
Category : History
Total pages :306
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Broadens the scope and meaning of American Indian political activism by focusing on the movement's early--and largely neglected--struggles, revealing how early activists exploited Cold War tensions in ways that brought national attention to their issues.

The Indians’ New World

The Indians’ New World
Author : James H. Merrell
Publisher : UNC Press Books
Release Date : 2012-12-01
Category : History
Total pages :424
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This eloquent, pathbreaking account follows the Catawbas from their first contact with Europeans in the sixteenth century until they carved out a place in the American republic three centuries later. It is a story of Native agency, creativity, resilience, and endurance. Upon its original publication in 1989, James Merrell's definitive history of Catawbas and their neighbors in the southern piedmont helped signal a new direction in the study of Native Americans, serving as a model for their reintegration into American history. In an introduction written for this twentieth anniversary edition, Merrell recalls the book's origins and considers its place in the field of early American history in general and Native American history in particular, both at the time it was first published and two decades later.