January 20, 2021

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Aircraft Wake Turbulence and Its Detection

Aircraft Wake Turbulence and Its Detection
Author : John Olsen
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date : 2012-12-06
Category : Technology & Engineering
Total pages :602
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The combination of increasing airport congestion and the ad vent of large transports has caused increased interest in aircraft wake turbulence. A quantitative understanding of the interaction between an aircraft and the vortex wake of a preceding aircraft is necessary for planning future high density air traffic patterns and control systems. The nature of the interaction depends on both the characteristics of the following aircraft and the characteristics of the wake. Some of the questions to be answered are: What deter mines the full characteristics of the vortex wake? What properties of the following aircraft are important? What is the role of pilot response? How are the wake characteristics related to the genera ting aircraft parameters? How does the wake disintegrate and where? Many of these questions were addressed at this first Aircraft Wake Turbulence Symposium sponsored by the Air Force Office of Sci entific Research and The Boeing Company. Workers engaged in aero dynamic research, airport operations, and instrument development came from several count ries to present their results and exchange information. The new results from the meeting provide a current picture of the state of the knowledge on vortex wakes and their interactions with other aircraft. Phenomena previously regarded as mere curiosities have emerged as important tools for understanding or controlling vortex wakes. The new types of instability occurring within the wake may one day be used for promoting early dis integration of the hazardous twin vortex structure.

A Candidate Wake Vortex Strength Definition for Application to the NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS)

A Candidate Wake Vortex Strength Definition for Application to the NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS)
Author : David A. Hinton
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1997
Category : Airports
Total pages :36
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NASA technical note

NASA technical note
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1972
Category : Aeronautics
Total pages :129
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NASA Technical Note

NASA Technical Note
Author : United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1972
Category : Aeronautics
Total pages :129
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NASA Technical Paper

NASA Technical Paper
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1985
Category : Science
Total pages :129
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An Evaluation of the Measurement Requirements for an In-Situ Wake Vortex Detection System

An Evaluation of the Measurement Requirements for an In-Situ Wake Vortex Detection System
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1996
Category :
Total pages :26
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Journal of Aircraft

Journal of Aircraft
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1997
Category : Aeronautics
Total pages :129
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Wake Turbulence Training Aid

Wake Turbulence Training Aid
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1995
Category : Air pilots
Total pages :129
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Aircraft Wake Vortices

Aircraft Wake Vortices
Author : T. E. Sullivan
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1990
Category : Wakes (Aerodynamics)
Total pages :59
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The state of knowledge about aircraft wake vortices in the summer of 1990 is summarized. With the advent of a new FAA wake vortex program, the current situation was assessed by answering five questions: (1) What do we know about wake vortices, (2) what don't we know about wake vortices, (3) what are the requirements and limitations for operational systems to solve the wake vortex problems, (4) where do we go from here, and (5) why do we need to collect more wake vortex data.

Wake Vortex Minimization

Wake Vortex Minimization
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1977
Category : Vortex-motion
Total pages :403
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Aeronautical Engineering

Aeronautical Engineering
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1979
Category : Aeronautics
Total pages :129
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A selection of annotated references to unclassified reports and journal articles that were introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system and announced in Scientific and technical aerospace reports (STAR) and International aerospace abstracts (IAA).

A Flight Evaluation of Methods for Predicting Vortex Wake Effects on Trailing Aircraft

A Flight Evaluation of Methods for Predicting Vortex Wake Effects on Trailing Aircraft
Author : Glenn H. Robinson,Richard R. Larson
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1972
Category : Jet transports
Total pages :58
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The results of four current analytical methods for predicting wing vortex strength and decay rate are compared with the results of a flight investigation of the wake characteristics of several large jet transport aircraft. An empirical expression defining the strength and decay rate of wake vortices is developed that best represents most of the flight-test data. However, the expression is not applicable to small aircraft that would be immersed in the vortex wake of large aircraft.

Wake Vortex Field Measurement Program at Memphis, Tennessee: Data Guide

Wake Vortex Field Measurement Program at Memphis, Tennessee: Data Guide
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1997
Category :
Total pages :112
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The Aeronautical Quarterly

The Aeronautical Quarterly
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1972
Category : Aerodynamics
Total pages :129
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Vortex Wakes of Conventional Aircraft

Vortex Wakes of Conventional Aircraft
Author : Coleman duPont Donaldson,Alan J. Bilanin
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1975
Category : Turbulence
Total pages :79
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A review is made of the present state of our knowledge of the vortex wakes of conventional aircraft. Included are discussions of wake rollup, geometry, instability, and turbulent aging. In the light of these discussions, a brief review is made of the persistence of vortices in the atmosphere, and design techniques which might be used to minimize wake hazard are considered.