November 27, 2020

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Women and the American Labor Movement

Women and the American Labor Movement
Author : Philip Sheldon Foner
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1982
Category : Business & Economics
Total pages :612
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Women and the American Labor Movement

Women and the American Labor Movement
Author : Philip Sheldon Foner
Publisher : New York : Free Press
Release Date : 1979
Category : Business & Economics
Total pages :621
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Documents and contemporary writings underlie a study of women workers' fight to gain union recognition, win parity with male workers, and organize the steel mills, Southern textile mills, and California grape and lettuce pickers

Feminism in the Labor Movement

Feminism in the Labor Movement
Author : Nancy Felice Gabin
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1990
Category : Business & Economics
Total pages :257
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Gabin documents the struggles of United Auto Workers (UAW) women to achieve greater opportunity in the union, on the job, and ultimately in American society. Although the women never overcame segregated work and union hierarchies, they made considerable inroads from the 1940s forward. Contrasting the ideology of the union with the reality of their place in the auto industry, women pressed for recognition through the formation of a Women's Bureau in the UAW. This book addresses important issues in women's and labor history, and explores the complex and contingent character of the mediation process between feminism and unionism within the UAW. ISBN 0-8014-2435-6: $31.25.

Gendering Labor History

Gendering Labor History
Author : Alice Kessler-Harris
Publisher : University of Illinois Press
Release Date : 2007
Category : History
Total pages :374
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The role of gender in the history of the working class world

The Sex of Class

The Sex of Class
Author : Dorothy Sue Cobble
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release Date : 2007-03-15
Category : Political Science
Total pages :327
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Women now comprise the majority of the working class. Yet this fundamental transformation has gone largely unnoticed. This book is about how the sex of workers matters in understanding the jobs they do, the problems they face at work, and the new labor movements they are creating in the United States and globally. In The Sex of Class, twenty prominent scholars, labor leaders, and policy analysts look at the implication of this "sexual revolution" for labor policy and practice. The Sex of Class introduces readers to some of the most vibrant and forward-thinking social movements of our era: the clerical worker protests of the 1970s; the emergence of gay rights on the auto shop floor; the upsurge of union organizing in service jobs; worker centers and community unions of immigrant women; successful campaigns for paid family leave and work redesign; and innovative labor NGOs, cross-border alliances, and global labor federations. Revealing the animating ideas and the innovative strategies put into practice by the female leaders of the twenty-first-century social justice movement, the contributors to this book offer new ideas for how government can help reduce class and sex inequalities. They assess the status of women and sexual minorities within the traditional labor movement and they provide inspiring case studies of how women workers and their allies are inventing new forms of worker representation and power.

Our Unions, Our Selves

Our Unions, Our Selves
Author : Anne Zacharias-Walsh
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release Date : 2016-08-03
Category : Political Science
Total pages :240
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In Our Unions, Our Selves, Anne Zacharias-Walsh provides an in-depth look at the rise of women-only unions in Japan, an organizational analysis of the challenges these new unions face in practice, and a firsthand account of the ambitious, occasionally contentious, and ultimately successful international solidarity project that helped to spark a new feminist labor movement. In the early 1990s, as part of a larger wave of union reform efforts in Japan, women began creating their own women-only labor unions to confront long-standing gender inequality in the workplace and in traditional enterprise unions. These new unions soon discovered that the demand for individual assistance and help at the bargaining table dramatically exceeded the rate at which the unions could recruit and train members to meet that demand. Within just a few years, women-only unions were proving to be both the most effective option women had for addressing problems on the job and in serious danger of dying out because of their inability to grow their organizational capacity. Zacharias-Walsh met up with Japanese women’s unions at a critical moment in their struggle to survive. Recognizing the benefits of a cross-national dialogue, they teamed up to host a multiyear international exchange project that brought together U.S. and Japanese activists and scholars to investigate the links between organizational structure and the day-to-day problems nontraditional unions face, and to develop Japan-specific participatory labor education as a way to organize and empower new generations of members. They also gained valuable insights into the fine art of building and maintaining the kinds of collaborative, cross border relationships that are essential to today’s social justice movements, from global efforts to save the environment to the Fight for $15 and Black Lives Matter.

Work Engendered

Work Engendered
Author : Ava Baron
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Release Date : 2018-05-31
Category : Political Science
Total pages :400
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In tobacco fields, auto and radio factories, cigarmakers' tenements, textile mills, print shops, insurance companies, restaurants, and bars, notions of masculinity and femininity have helped shape the development of work and the working class. The fourteen original essays brought together here shed new light on the importance of gender for economic and class analysis and for the study of men as well as women workers. After an introduction by Ava Baron addressing current problems in conceptualizing gender and work, chapters by leading historians consider how gender has colored relations of power and hierarchy—between employers and workers, men and boys, whites and blacks, native-born Americans and immigrants, as well as between men and women—in North America from the 1830s to the 1970s. Individual essays explore a spectrum of topics including union bureaucratization, protective legislation, and consumer organizing. They examine how workers' concerns about gender identity influenced their job choices, the ways in which they thought about and performed their work, and the strategies they adopted toward employers and other workers. Taken together, the essays illuminate the plasticity of gender as men and women contest its meaning and its implications for class relations. Anyone interested in labor history, women's history, and the sociology of work or gender will want to read this pathbreaking book.

Protest And Popular Culture

Protest And Popular Culture
Author : Mary Triece
Publisher : Westview Press
Release Date : 2001-01-05
Category : Social Science
Total pages :304
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Revealing Class Differences -- Upending the "Happy Home -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 5 Protest and Popular Culture: Bridging Past and Present -- Lesson 1: The Persistence of Popular Ideologies -- Lesson 2: The Relevance of a Laboring Agency and Extra-discursive Tactics -- Contemporary Parallels: Popular Media Portrayals -- The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same: The Late-Twentieth-Century Workplace -- Final Thoughts -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index

History of the Labor Movement in the United States

History of the Labor Movement in the United States
Author : Philip S. Foner
Publisher : INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHERS CO
Release Date : 1987-10
Category : Business & Economics
Total pages :305
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Traces the history of labor unions and the labor movement from America's colonial era, through the Industrial Revolution, to the present

The Other Women's Movement

The Other Women's Movement
Author : Dorothy Sue Cobble
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release Date : 2011-08-15
Category : History
Total pages :336
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American feminism has always been about more than the struggle for individual rights and equal treatment with men. There's also a vital and continuing tradition of women's reform that sought social as well as individual rights and argued for the dismantling of the masculine standard. In this much anticipated book, Dorothy Sue Cobble retrieves the forgotten feminism of the previous generations of working women, illuminating the ideas that inspired them and the reforms they secured from employers and the state. This socially and ethnically diverse movement for change emerged first from union halls and factory floors and spread to the "pink collar" domain of telephone operators, secretaries, and airline hostesses. From the 1930s to the 1980s, these women pursued answers to problems that are increasingly pressing today: how to balance work and family and how to address the growing economic inequalities that confront us. The Other Women's Movement traces their impact from the 1940s into the feminist movement of the present. The labor reformers whose stories are told in The Other Women's Movement wanted equality and "special benefits," and they did not see the two as incompatible. They argued that gender differences must be accommodated and that "equality" could not always be achieved by applying an identical standard of treatment to men and women. The reform agenda they championed--an end to unfair sex discrimination, just compensation for their waged labor, and the right to care for their families and communities--launched a revolution in employment practices that carries on today. Unique in its range and perspective, this is the first book to link the continuous tradition of social feminism to the leadership of labor women within that movement.

On Gender, Labor, and Inequality

On Gender, Labor, and Inequality
Author : Ruth Milkman
Publisher : University of Illinois Press
Release Date : 2016-07-15
Category : Social Science
Total pages :296
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Ruth Milkman's groundbreaking research in women's labor history has contributed important perspectives on work and unionism in the United States. On Gender, Labor, and Inequality presents four decades of Milkman's essential writings, tracing the parallel evolutions of her ideas and the field she helped define. Milkman's introduction frames a career-spanning scholarly project: her interrogation of historical and contemporary intersections of class and gender inequalities in the workplace, and the efforts to challenge those inequalities. Early chapters focus on her pioneering work on women's labor during the Great Depression and the World War II years. In the book's second half, Milkman turns to the past fifty years, a period that saw a dramatic decline in gender inequality even as growing class imbalances created greater-than-ever class disparity among women. She concludes with a previously unpublished essay comparing the impact of the Great Depression and the Great Recession on women workers.

Disposable Domestics

Disposable Domestics
Author : Grace Chang
Publisher : Haymarket Books
Release Date : 2016-07-04
Category : Political Science
Total pages :235
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Illegal. Unamerican. Disposable. In a nation with an unprecedented history of immigration, the prevailing image of those who cross our borders in search of equal opportunity is that of a drain. Grace Chang's vital account of immigrant women—who work as nannies, domestic workers, janitors, nursing aides, and homecare workers—proves just the opposite: the women who perform our least desirable jobs are the most crucial to our economy and society. Disposable Domestics highlights the unrewarded work immigrant women perform as caregivers, cleaners, and servers and shows how these women are actively resisting the exploitation they face.

Lucy Parsons

Lucy Parsons
Author : Carolyn Ashbaugh
Publisher : Haymarket Books
Release Date : 2013-02-05
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Total pages :282
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A woman ahead of her time, Lucy Parsons was an early American radical who defied all the conventions of her turbulent era. Born in 1853 in Texas, she was an outspoken black woman, radical writer and labour organiser. Parsons led the defence campaign for the 'Haymarket martyrs,' which included her husband Albert Parsons and remained active in the struggles of the oppressed throughout her life. This is the unique and inspiring story of a woman described in the 1920s by the Chicago police as 'more dangerous than a thousand rioters'.

Beaten Down, Worked Up

Beaten Down, Worked Up
Author : Steven Greenhouse
Publisher : Anchor
Release Date : 2020-07-21
Category : Business & Economics
Total pages :416
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From longtime New York Times labor correspondent, an in-depth and stirring look at working men and women in America, the challenges they face, and the ways in which they can be re-empowered. In an era when corporate profits have soared while wages have flatlined, millions of Americans are searching for ways to improve their lives, and they're often turning to labor unions and worker action, whether #RedforEd teachers' strikes or the Fight for $15. Wage stagnation, low-wage work, and blighted blue-collar communities have become an all-too-common part of modern-day America, and behind these trends is a little-discussed problem: the decades-long decline in worker power. This decline is reflected in some of the most pressing problems facing our nation today, including income inequality, declining social mobility, the gender pay gap, and the concentration of political power in the hands of the wealthy. In his sweeping, robust new work, Steven Greenhouse rebuts the often-stated view that labor unions are outmoded--or even harmful--by recounting some of labor's victories, and the efforts of several of today's most innovative and successful worker groups. He shows us the modern labor landscape through the stories of dozens of American workers, from G.M. workers to Uber drivers, and we see how unions historically have empowered--and lifted--the most marginalized, including young women garment workers in New York in 1909, black sanitation workers in Memphis in 1968, and hotel housekeepers today. Greenhouse proposes concrete, feasible ways in which workers' collective power can be--and is being--rekindled and reimagined in the twenty-first century.

History of the Labor Movement in the United States

History of the Labor Movement in the United States
Author : Phlip S. Foner
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 1972
Category :
Total pages :129
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