January 24, 2021

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Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies
Author : Seth Holmes
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release Date : 2013-06-19
Category : Social Science
Total pages :264
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Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies provides an intimate examination of the everyday lives and suffering of Mexican migrants in our contemporary food system. An anthropologist and MD in the mold of Paul Farmer and Didier Fassin, Holmes shows how market forces, anti-immigrant sentiment, and racism undermine health and health care. Holmes’s material is visceral and powerful. He trekked with his companions illegally through the desert into Arizona and was jailed with them before they were deported. He lived with indigenous families in the mountains of Oaxaca and in farm labor camps in the U.S., planted and harvested corn, picked strawberries, and accompanied sick workers to clinics and hospitals. This “embodied anthropology” deepens our theoretical understanding of the ways in which social inequalities and suffering come to be perceived as normal and natural in society and in health care. All of the book award money and royalties from the sales of this book have been donated to farm worker unions, farm worker organizations and farm worker projects in consultation with farm workers who appear in the book.

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies
Author : Seth Holmes
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release Date : 2013-05-25
Category : Political Science
Total pages :234
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"Based on five years of research in the field (including berry-picking and traveling with migrants back and forth from Oaxaca up the West Coast), Holmes, an anthropologist and MD in the mold of Paul Farmer and Didier Fassin, uncovers how market forces, anti-immigrant sentiment, and racism undermine health and health care."--From publisher description.

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies
Author : Seth Holmes
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release Date : 2013-05-25
Category : Social Science
Total pages :234
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This book is an ethnographic witness to the everyday lives and suffering of Mexican migrants. Based on five years of research in the field (including berry-picking and traveling with migrants back and forth from Oaxaca up the West Coast), Holmes, an anthropologist and MD in the mold of Paul Farmer and Didier Fassin, uncovers how market forces, anti-immigrant sentiment, and racism undermine health and health care. Holmes' material is visceral and powerful?for instance, he trekked with his informants illegally through the desert border into Arizona, where they were apprehended and jailed by the Border Patrol. After he was released from jail (and his companions were deported back to Mexico), Holmes interviewed Border Patrol agents, local residents, and armed vigilantes in the borderlands. He lived with indigenous Mexican families in the mountains of Oaxaca and in farm labor camps in the United States, planted and harvested corn, picked strawberries, accompanied sick workers to clinics and hospitals, participated in healing rituals, and mourned at funerals for friends. The result is a "thick description" that conveys the full measure of struggle, suffering, and resilience of these farmworkers. Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies weds the theoretical analysis of the anthropologist with the intimacy of the journalist to provide a compelling examination of structural and symbolic violence, medicalization, and the clinical gaze as they affect the experiences and perceptions of a vertical slice of indigenous Mexican migrant farmworkers, farm owners, doctors, and nurses. This reflexive, embodied anthropology deepens our theoretical understanding of the ways in which socially structured suffering comes to be perceived as normal and natural in society and in health care, especially through imputations of ethnic body difference. In the vehement debates on immigration reform and health reform, this book provides the necessary stories of real people and insights into our food system and health care system for us to move forward to fair policies and solutions.

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States by Seth M. Holmes

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States by Seth M. Holmes
Author : Anonim
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2014
Category :
Total pages :129
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Medical Anthropology

Medical Anthropology
Author : Andrea S. Wiley,John Scott Allen
Publisher : Unknown
Release Date : 2009
Category : Medical
Total pages :459
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Intended as the primary text for introductory courses on medical anthropology, this book integrates human biological data relevant to health and disease with both evolutionary theory and the social environments that more often than not produce major challenges to health and survival. Becausestudents who take this fastest-growing anthropology course come from a variety of disciplines (anthropology, biology, especially pre-med students, and health sciences, especially), the text does not assume anything beyond a basic high-school level familiarity with human biology and anthropology. Theauthors first present basic biological information on a particular health condition and then expand their analysis to include evolutionary, historical, and cross-cultural perspectives. Among the topics covered are nutrition, infectious disease, stress, reproductive health, behavioral disease, aging,race/racism and health, mental health, and healers and healing.

The Unending Hunger

The Unending Hunger
Author : Megan A. Carney
Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release Date : 2015-01-23
Category : Social Science
Total pages :272
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Based on ethnographic fieldwork from Santa Barbara, California, this book sheds light on the ways that food insecurity prevails in women’s experiences of migration from Mexico and Central America to the United States. As women grapple with the pervasive conditions of poverty that hinder efforts at getting enough to eat, they find few options for alleviating the various forms of suffering that accompany food insecurity. Examining how constraints on eating and feeding translate to the uneven distribution of life chances across borders and how “food security” comes to dominate national policy in the United States, this book argues for understanding women’s relations to these processes as inherently biopolitical.

Migrant Dubai

Migrant Dubai
Author : Laavanya Kathiravelu
Publisher : Springer
Release Date : 2016-04-29
Category : Social Science
Total pages :246
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This book analyzes the everyday lives of labour migrants in a rapidly developing city-state. Using the emirate of Dubai as a case study, Migrant Dubai shows that even within highly restrictive mobility regimes, marginalized migrants find ways to cope with structural inequalities and quotidian modes of discrimination.

Making War at Fort Hood

Making War at Fort Hood
Author : Kenneth T. MacLeish
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release Date : 2015-03-01
Category : Social Science
Total pages :280
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Making War at Fort Hood offers an illuminating look at war through the daily lives of the people whose job it is to produce it. Kenneth MacLeish conducted a year of intensive fieldwork among soldiers and their families at and around the US Army's Fort Hood in central Texas. He shows how war's reach extends far beyond the battlefield into military communities where violence is as routine, boring, and normal as it is shocking and traumatic. Fort Hood is one of the largest military installations in the world, and many of the 55,000 personnel based there have served multiple tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. MacLeish provides intimate portraits of Fort Hood's soldiers and those closest to them, drawing on numerous in-depth interviews and diverse ethnographic material. He explores the exceptional position that soldiers occupy in relation to violence--not only trained to fight and kill, but placed deliberately in harm's way and offered up to die. The death and destruction of war happen to soldiers on purpose. MacLeish interweaves gripping narrative with critical theory and anthropological analysis to vividly describe this unique condition of vulnerability. Along the way, he sheds new light on the dynamics of military family life, stereotypes of veterans, what it means for civilians to say "thank you" to soldiers, and other questions about the sometimes ordinary, sometimes agonizing labor of making war. Making War at Fort Hood is the first ethnography to examine the everyday lives of the soldiers, families, and communities who personally bear the burden of America's most recent wars.

'Being Alive Well'

'Being Alive Well'
Author : Naomi Adelson
Publisher : University of Toronto Press
Release Date : 2000-12-15
Category : Social Science
Total pages :160
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'Being Alive Well': Health and the Politics of Cree Well-Being is a critical medical anthropological analysis of health theory in the social sciences with specific reference to the James Bay Cree of northern Quebec. In it the author argues that definitions of health are not simply reflections of physiological soundness but convey broader cultural and political realities. The book begins with a treatise on the study of health in the social sciences and a call for a broader understanding of the cultural parameters of any definition of health. Following a chapter that outlines the history of the Whapmagoostui (Great Whale River) region and the people, Adelson presents the underlying symbolic foundations of a Cree concept of health, or miyupimaatisiiun. The core of this book is an ethnographic study of the Whapmagoostui Cree and their particular concept of "health" (miyupimaatisiiun or "being alive well"). That concept is mediated by history, cultural practices, and the contemporary world of the Cree, including their fundamental concerns about their land and culture. In the contemporary context, health – or more specifically, "being alive well" – for the Cree of Great Whale is an intimate fusion of social, political, and personal well-being, thus linking individual bodies to a larger socio-political reality.

The Secret Lives of Anthropologists

The Secret Lives of Anthropologists
Author : Bonnie L. Hewlett
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date : 2019-12-05
Category : Social Science
Total pages :362
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This book addresses the difficult conditions researchers may face in the field and provides lessons in how to navigate the various social, political, economic, health, and environmental challenges involved in fieldwork. It also sheds important light on aspects often considered "secret" or taboo. From anthropologists just starting out to those with over forty years in the field, these researchers offer the benefit of their experience conducting research in diverse cultures around the world. The contributions combine engaging personal narrative with consideration of theory and methods. The volume emphasizes how being adaptable, and aware, of the many risks and rewards of ethnographic research can help foster success in quantitative and qualitative data collection. This is a valuable resource for students of anthropological methods and those about to embark on fieldwork for the first time.

Violence

Violence
Author : Parvis Ghassem-Fachandi
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date : 2020-07-12
Category : Social Science
Total pages :176
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Violence takes many forms. From large-scale acts of terrorism to assaults on single individuals, violence is a defining force in shaping human experience and a central theme in anthropological study. Violence: Ethnographic Encounters presents a set of vivid first-hand accounts of fieldwork experiences of violence. The examples range across Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa, and illustrate instances of state terror, insurgency, communal violence, war, prison violence, class conflict, security measures, and sexual violence. How do these anthropologists come to know a place through such violent experience? Why do they not leave such scenes? What insights follow from such experience? Violence: Ethnographic Encounters offers readers a broad anthropological study of violence through personal encounters.

The Performance of Gender

The Performance of Gender
Author : Cecilia Busby
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date : 2020-08-21
Category : Social Science
Total pages :256
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The Performance of Gender presents a vivid description of everyday life in order to explore the concept of performance for an anthropology of gender. A detailed and evocotive account of the lives of men and women in a South Indian fishing community reveals new ways of framing gender relations, the body and kinship. The ethnographic account is set within the context of social and cultural theory, notably the ideas of Judith Butler, Pierre Bourdieu and Michel Foucault. The study sheds new light on the ways in which gender is understood as both performative, that is enacted through everyday practices, and also substantial and embodied, that is marked out in the separate sexual fluids and procreative capacities of husbands and wives.

Creators, Conquerors, and Citizens

Creators, Conquerors, and Citizens
Author : Robin Waterfield
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release Date : 2018-04-19
Category : Civilization, Ancient
Total pages :544
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"We Greeks are one in blood and one in language; we have temples to the gods and religious rites in common, and a common way of life." HerodotusThroughout the course of ancient Greek civilisation, there always existed a sense of shared culture among the many Greek communities scattered throughout the Mediterranean. During the Classical (479-338) and Hellenistic (338-30) periods, the countless individual poleis of the Archaic period gradually came together in leagues and alliances, and finally were more or less united when they fell under the Roman empire.But what is fascinating about this process is how much resistance there was to it. The Greeks found it impossible to unify when faced with common enemies. Even under Roman rule the Greek cities still bickered. Acts of union -- going back to the legendary Trojan War -- were widely celebrated, but made little practical difference. If the Greeks knew that they were kin, why is Greek history so often the history of their internecine wars and other forms of competition with one another? This is the question acclaimed historian Robin Waterfield sets out to explore in Creators, Conquerors, and Citizens.This extraordinary contradiction -- the recognition that they were all Greeks, but the deep-seated reluctance to unify -- is at the heart of this ambitious new history. The culmination of a lifetime of research, Waterfield gives a comprehensive account of seven hundred years, from the emergence of the Greeks around 750 BCE to the downfall of the last of the Greco-Macedonian kingdoms in 30 BCE, looking at political, military, social, and cultural history.

Consuming Grief

Consuming Grief
Author : Beth A. Conklin
Publisher : University of Texas Press
Release Date : 2010-01-10
Category : Social Science
Total pages :320
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Mourning the death of loved ones and recovering from their loss are universal human experiences, yet the grieving process is as different between cultures as it is among individuals. As late as the 1960s, the Wari' Indians of the western Amazonian rainforest ate the roasted flesh of their dead as an expression of compassion for the deceased and for his or her close relatives. By removing and transforming the corpse, which embodied ties between the living and the dead and was a focus of grief for the family of the deceased, Wari' death rites helped the bereaved kin accept their loss and go on with their lives. Drawing on the recollections of Wari' elders who participated in consuming the dead, this book presents one of the richest, most authoritative ethnographic accounts of funerary cannibalism ever recorded. Beth Conklin explores Wari' conceptions of person, body, and spirit, as well as indigenous understandings of memory and emotion, to explain why the Wari' felt that corpses must be destroyed and why they preferred cannibalism over cremation. Her findings challenge many commonly held beliefs about cannibalism and show why, in Wari' terms, it was considered the most honorable and compassionate way of treating the dead.

The Meaning of Leisure

The Meaning of Leisure
Author : Vania L. Sandoval
Publisher : Springer
Release Date : 2017-07-26
Category : Social Science
Total pages :218
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This book deals with the concept of leisure and the everyday leisure practices of a group of diverse single women in an urban setting—Mannheim, Germany. Vania Sandoval focuses on how social structure and individual choices relate to each other in the local context. Initially, the book considers the women as a relatively homogenous group, analyzing how they conceive, organize and experience their leisure in a similar manner with individual nuances. It then proceeds to highlight some of the processes that lead, in this particular case, to migration-based differences in their leisure practices.